Total Food 2: The story behind the cover

9780195594553Total Food 2, published in January 2015, was nominated for Best Designed Educational Primary/Secondary Book at the 63rd Australian Book Design Awards, and we are proud to announce the book won its category.

Cover Designer Kim Ferguson
Internal Designers Kim Ferguson, Aisling Gallagher & Sue Dani

Now Kim Ferguson, the cover designer, talks us through the cover Total Food 2:

  1. What was the brief you were given?
    The brief for Total Food covers was to be ‘fun, personable, friendly, playful, positive and inviting’. The publisher wanted to really tap into the similar ethic that Jamie Oliver has – making learning about good food, growing, cooking and eating an enjoyable and easy part of a children lifestyle.Kim 3
  1. How did you come up with the concept for this cover?
    The idea of using youthful hands holding raw food developed through the process of image research. The simple presentation of food being held by a teenager seemed a really subtle but strong way to show the process of eating food – from the starting point of picking fresh food.
  1. What made you choose the photograph on the cover?
    After extensive searching the final image for the cover was chosen for it’s striking colour and fresh lighting. It struck me as being modern, youthful and showing the rich deliciousness of raw, fresh food!
  1. What is your favourite thing about the cover?
    My favourite thing about the cover is the contrast of the vibrant colours – looks so yum (and any chance to slip some pink on a cover is a win!)
  1. What did you enjoy most about working on this cover?
    Finding so many great images that I wanted to use!

    Kim 1
  1. What was the most challenging aspect?
    The most challenging aspect of the cover designs was to find a shared vision for the imagery and to not eat too much after looking at food images all day!
    Kim 2
  1. What is something about this cover we might not know?
    That the original image showed the girl wearing some lovely gold bracelets that I Photoshopped out to allow the text to be more legible!

Congratulations to the Total Food 2 design team.

Consumer Behaviour in Action: The story behind the cover

9780195525601

Consumer Behaviour in Action, published in January 2015, was nominated for Best Designed Educational Tertiary Book at the 63rd Australian Book Design Awards, and we are proud to announce the book won its category.

Now Regine Abos, the designer, talks us through the cover and internal design process of Consumer Behaviour in Action:

  1. What was the brief you were given?
    The brief was to come up with a slick, polished design that would appeal to second and third year business/marketing students.
  2. How did you come up with the concept for this cover?
    LinginternalI always try to focus my designs on things or concepts that I’m actually interested in so that I enjoy the work and produce better results. So for this book, I put forward a few different concepts but really pushed for the one that featured one of my favourite things: shoes! And what better way to encapsulate consumer behaviour than a woman’s love for shoes? Luckily the publishers and the marketing team agreed. I then added tags and receipts throughout the book to further reinforce the theme of consumption.
  3. What made you choose the photograph on the cover?
    This particular photo encompassed both the social aspect (photographing her shoes then sharing photos via social media) and the psychological aspect (the wants versus the needs) of the topic. The retro colour scheme is also very “now” and therefore appealing to students.
  4. What is your favourite thing about the cover?
    The way the receipt interacts with the photograph in the background; it gives it a business-like yet friendly feel.
  5. What did you enjoy most about working on this cover?
    Looking through photographs of shoes!!
  6. What was the most challenging aspect?
    One of the authors initially had reservations about the cultural aspect of showing feet and shoes. Feet in Asian and Middle Eastern countries have quite a negative connotations: they’re often regarded as filthy as its where negative energy leaves the body and it’s a sign of disrespect if you enter someone’s home with your shoes on. The author’s suggestion was to use mobile phones instead, but since technology changes so quickly, the consensus in the end was to go with the shoes. Whew!
  7. What is something about the design of this book we might not know?
    The running heads were meant to have little Converse sneakers on them but as a compromise with the author mentioned above, these were removed.

Congratulations on designing a beautiful book Regine!

Oxford wins at the 2015 Australian Book Design Awards

The 63rd Australian Book Design Awards were held in Sydney on Friday 22nd May. Three Oxford titles were nominated across two categories:
Ling

Primary We are proud to announce that Oxford won both categories with Total Food 2 and Consumer Behaviour in Action. Details of Oxford’s winning and shortlisted titles in each category can be found below:

9780195525601Best Designed Educational Tertiary Book Sponsored by Australian Academic Design Libraries
Winner: Consumer Behaviour in Action
Designer Regine Abos

 

9780195594553Best Designed Educational Primary / Secondary Book Sponsored by Australian Academic Design Libraries
Winner: Total Food 2
Cover Designer Kim Ferguson
Internal Designers Kim Ferguson, Aisling Gallagher & Sue Dani

 

9780195589689

Shortlisted: Who Eats Who?
Cover Designer Regine Abos
Internal Designers Regine Abos & Fiona Lee

We’d like to congratulate our design team, a lot of skill and hard work goes into the design of our books and we’re proud the ABDA recognise the excellent work of Regine, Kim and their team.

Arthur Conan Doyle was born on this day

9780199672066Arthur Conan Doyle was born 156 years ago today in Edinburgh, Scotland. The third of ten children, Conan Doyle studied medicine at Edinburgh University and worked as a ship’s doctor before setting up his own practice in Southsea. He later gave up practicing medicine to pursue a literary career full-time and penned one of fiction’s most famous detectives, Sherlock Holmes.

To celebrate his birthday, here are five interesting particulars about Arthur Conan Doyle’s life and writings:

1. The inspiration for Sherlock Holmes came from Conan Doyle’s medical studies, where he was mentored by Dr Joseph Bell. Bell was known for his powers of deduction and superior observational skills and could diagnosis a patient, building detailed analysis of their lifestyle purely from his observations.

2. Conan Doyle wrote fifty-six short stories and four novels around the character of Sherlock Holmes between 1887 and 1927. Conan Doyle originally killed off the detective in ‘The Final Problem’, so he could pursue other literary efforts. After a public outcry from his readers, the writer eventually revived Holmes and penned The Hound of Baskervilles.

3. While he is most famously known for writing the Sherlock Holmes stories, Conan Doyle also authored a number of historical titles, fantasy novel The Lost World and a pamphlet entitled The War in South Africa: Its Cause and Conduct. For the latter work, Conan Doyle was knighted by King Edward VII.

4. Apart from his interests in medicine and literature, Conan Doyle also had political aspirations and was a crusader for justice. He stood for Parliament (but was unsuccessful both times) and investigated two closed cases, where his work helped to correct miscarriages of justice.

5. After watching Houdini’s act in 1920 at Portsmouth, the author and illusionist became friends. They would later become public foes, over their differing beliefs as Conan Doyle and his second wife, Jean, became heavily involved in spiritualism. Conan Doyle toured internationally to lecture on his beliefs, participated in séances and compiled a two volume work The History of Spiritualism.

Want to know more about Arthur Conan Doyle?

Crime Fiction: A Very Short Introduction9780199658787
9780199658787
AU$15.95

 

9780199555482Oxford World’s Classics
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes
9780199555482
AU$14.95

 

Marketing and Product Specialist, Stephanie Swain, loves books, food, and books about food. She is slowly trying to make her way through reading the Oxford World’s Classics.

Children’s literature quiz: answers

The wait is over, the answers to our children’s literature quiz are here. Find out if you’re a children’s literature expert or whether you need to scrub up on your knowledge, by checking the answers below:

  1.  When was The Very Hungry Caterpillar first published?
    ANSWER:  A counting book by Eric Carle in 1969, this was one of the most enduringly popular children’s books of all time, with sales to date topping 30 million copies.
  2. ‘Once upon a time…’ is a formulation that has been used for the beginning of many traditional stories for how long?
    ANSWER:Over 6 centuries. It tends to be used at the beginning of stories which for the most part, see the hero and/or heroine ‘live happily ever after’ at the other end.
  3.  True or false. Beauty and the Beast is a fairy story that first appeared in English in 1757, in a translation from a French narrative.
    ANSWER: True, the story was adopted into English folklore as part of the Enlightenment desire to teach children about the virtues of good behaviour through narrative.
  4. What children’s book did author Roald Dahl not write?
    ANSWER: The Enormous Egg is a novel by the American author Oliver Butterworth (1915-90).
  5. Author Beatrix Potter of the ‘Peter Rabbit’ series of books kept which of the following as a pet?
    ANSWER: Potter often smuggled live creatures back to her home, including at various times a hare, several rabbits, mice, a tortoise, a rat and a hedgehog. She had a rabbit named Peter, a hedgehog named Mrs Tiggy and a white rat named Sammy.
  6. Which children’s book does this quote belong ‘To die will be an awfully big adventure’:
    ANSWER:  This quote originally comes from a version of Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie.
  7. The character Hush, from the Australian picture book Possum Magic, didn’t begin her life as a possum, what animal was she originally?
    ANSWER: Hush began life as a mouse and over half the book was illustrated when it was decided to strengthen the Australian theme and make her a possum.
  8. The first draft of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was titled what?
    ANSWER: The Emerald City. This was allegedly altered  because of a superstition that it is unlucky to publish a book with a jewel in the title.
  9.  Paul Jennings was the first writer to sell how many copies of his book in Australia?
    ANSWER: The British-born Australian author had the distinction of being the first writer to sell one million copies in Australia.
  10.  Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was an expansion of Alice’s Adventures Underground, which begun as an impromptu tale told to ten-year-old Alice Liddell.
    ANSWER: True, the tale was told to Alice and her sisters Lorina and Edith, daughters of the Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, during a boat trip on 4 July 1862.

Oxford-Companion-to-Childrens-LiteratureAll information has been taken from the new edition of The Oxford Companion to Children’s Literature. This accessible A to Z is the first place to look for information about the authors, illustrators, printers, publishers, educationalists, and others who have influenced the development of children’s literature, as well as the stories and characters at their centre. Written both to entertain and to instruct, this highly acclaimed Companion is a reference work that no one interested in the world of children’s books should be without.

Children’s literature quiz: test your knowledge

The last thirty years have witnessed one of the most fertile periods in the history of children’s books: the flowering of imaginative illustration and writing, the Harry Potter phenomenon, the rise of young adult and crossover fiction, and books that tackle extraordinarily difficult subjects. The Oxford Companion to Children’s Literature provides an indispensable and fascinating reference guide to the world of children’s literature and to celebrate the release of the new edition, we bring you this quiz to test your knowledge.

1. When was The Very Hungry Caterpillar first published?

a) 1969
b) 1962
c) 1970
d) 1974

2.‘Once upon a time…’ is a formulation that has been used for the beginning of many traditional stories for how long?

a) Over 8 centuries
b) Over 10 centuries
c) Over 6 centuries
d) Over 12 centuries

3. True or false. Beauty and the Beast is a fairy story that first appeared in English in 1757, in a translation from a French narrative.

a) True
b) False

4. What children’s book did author Roald Dahl not write?

a) Danny, the Champion of the World
b) The Enormous Egg
c) The Magic Finger
d) James and the Giant Peach

 5. Author Beatrix Potter of the ‘Peter Rabbit’ series of books kept which of the following as a pet?

a) A rabbit named Peter
b) A hedgehog named Mrs Tiggy
c) A white rat named Sammy
d) All of the above

 6. Which children’s book does this quote belong ‘To die will be an awfully big adventure’:

a) The Jungle Book
b) Treasure Island
c) Mary Poppins
d) Peter Pan

7. The character Hush, from the Australian picture book Possum Magic, didn’t begin her life as a possum, what animal was she originally?

a) A rat
b) A wombat
c) A mouse
d) A rabbit

8. The first draft of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was titled what?

a) Wicked
b) The Emerald City
c) The Land of Oz
d) Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz

9. Paul Jennings was the first writer to sell how many copies of his book in Australia?

a) 1 million
b) 750,000
c) 500,000
d) 900,000

10. True or false. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was an expansion of Alice’s Adventures Underground, which begun as an impromptu tale told to ten-year-old Alice Liddell.

a) True
b) False

 Answers for this quiz will be posted tomorrow! If you can’t wait until then, look up the answers in the The Oxford Companion to Children’s Literature!

Oxford-Companion-to-Childrens-LiteratureAll information has been taken from the new edition of The Oxford Companion to Children’s Literature. This accessible A to Z is the first place to look for information about the authors, illustrators, printers, publishers, educationalists, and others who have influenced the development of children’s literature, as well as the stories and characters at their centre. Written both to entertain and to instruct, this highly acclaimed Companion is a reference work that no one interested in the world of children’s books should be without.

Memorable Mums in Literature

Mother’s Day is coming up and here at OUP we’ve got a question: who is the most memorable Mother in literature?
Is it a woman like Marilla Cuthbert who came into motherhood late when she adopted a strange little redhead, or one like Mrs Bennet whose poor nerves only desire is to see ‘one of [her] daughters happily settled at Netherfield and all the others equally well married’?

Vote below and make your suggestions for most memorable Mother in the comments!

The greatest enterprise of its time – The Oxford English Dictionary

It’s Wednesday 6 June 1928 and Stanley Baldwin, the British Prime Minister, is officially launching a book that has taken 70 years to complete.

‘Our histories, our novels, our poems, our plays – they are all in this one book,’ he says. ‘It is true that I have not read it – perhaps I never shall – but that does not mean I do not go often to it.’

You can’t blame the Prime Minister for not having read the whole book. The ten-volume work contains 15,490 pages and 227,779,589 letters and numbers. It is, of course, the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary.

The Dictionary’s story began in 1857, when a group of English-language experts, known as the Philological Society of London, published the paper ‘On Some Deficiencies in our English Dictionaries’.

Early dictionaries invited some criticism. When you looked up ‘oats’, for example, in Samuel Johnson’s pioneering work of 1755, the definition was more offensive than accurate: ‘A grain which in England is given to horses, but which in Scotland feeds the people’.

However, the philologists were more concerned with the amount of words that were missing, as well as the failure to provide the history of individual words. Having aired their grievances, they set about creating a dictionary that would do justice to the English language. Simon Winchester, in his history of the OED, writes that the aim was to create a ‘dictionary that would give, in essence and in fact, the meaning of everything’.

A team of volunteer readers was assembled, and each reader was given a list of English books. Their task was to record any quotations containing new words or meanings.

In 1879, the Society reached an agreement with Oxford University Press to publish their dictionary, which now had the snappy working title, A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles formed mainly on the Materials collected by the Philological Society and with the Assistance of many Scholars and Men of Science.

A Scotsman named James Murray was appointed editor, and he was presented with all the quotation slips that had been collected by the volunteer readers. As Winchester notes, Murray was shocked to find that ‘some of the sub-editors had put their hundredweight collections of papers into hessian sacks, and then left them to rot’. There was even a family of mice living in one of the sacks. Another problem was that all the slips for the letter ‘H’ were missing (they were eventually tracked down to an American diplomat’s villa in Florence).

There were still many books in the English language which hadn’t been read, so Murray launched an appeal for one thousand new readers. With the appeal, he attached a ‘List of books for which readers are wanted’, including books by 18th century authors (‘the literature of this century has hardly been touched’) and Charles Darwin, William Wordsworth and Charlotte Brontë. He also constructed a special workroom called a ‘Scriptorium’ where he could store all of the quotation slips he received.

In total, there were about two thousand readers for the Dictionary, with five million quotation slips submitted. Readers ranged from J.R.R. Tolkien, who would go on to write the Lord of the Rings trilogy, to William Chester Minor, a surgeon during the American Civil War who contributed to the Dictionary from the Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum.

It was originally predicted that the project would take ten years to complete. This was a miscalculation – in fact it took Murray and his team five years to reach the word ‘ant’. Murray died in 1915, so didn’t live to see the publication of his dictionary. He would, however, have been very pleased to hear the final remark of Stanley Baldwin’s speech in 1928: ‘The Oxford English Dictionary is the greatest enterprise of its kind in history.’

9780198611868


Oxford English Dictionary
20 Volume Set
9780198611868
AU$1451.95

 

Alex Chambers is the Editorial Assistant in Higher Education. He is a keen supporter of the Melbourne Demons, well-placed commas and the communal sweet jar.

 

Winter Warmers: Minestrone Soup

Minestrone SoupLiterally meaning ‘the big soup’ in Italian, minestrone is technically a hearty stew – soup made from vegetables, dried beans and pasta. A range of beans can be substituted for kidney beans, including cannellini, lima and borlotti.


Serves:
4
Prep time: 25 min
Cook time: 65 min|
Special equipment: large saucepan
Nutrition: good source of dietary fiber and lycopene; low in saturated fat
Skills: dicing, sweating, simmering

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 onion
  • 2 carrots
  • 2 sticks celery
  • 1 leek
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 6 teaspoons (30ml) olive oil
  • 200g pumpkin
  • 1 potato
  • 400 can tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons (40g) tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 4 cups (1L) vegetable stock*
  • ¼ cup (25g) small shell pasta
  • 2 zucchini
  • 400g can kidney beans
  • ½ cup (12g) flat-leaf parsley
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 20g parmesan and crusty bread to serve up

 

METHOD

  1. Peel and dice onions and carrots, slice celery and leek and crush garlic.
  2. Heat oil in large saucepan and sweat onion, carrots, celery, leek and garlic for 5 minutes.
  3. Peel and dice pumpkin and potato. Chop tomatoes and retain juice.
  4. Place pumpkin, potatoes, tomatoes and juice, tomato paste, oregano and basil in large saucepan with vegetable stock.
  5. Bring to boil over medium – high heat.
  6. Reduce heat to medium – low and cook for 40 minutes.
  7. Add pasta and cook for 10 minutes.
  8. Slice zucchini, add to saucepan and cook for another 10 minutes.
  9. Drain and rinse kidney beans and add to saucepan. Cook for another 5 minutes.
  10. Pluck parsley leaves from stalk, finely chop and add to saucepan. Season to taste.
  11. Finely grate parmesan cheese.
  12. To serve, ladle into 4 soup bowls, sprinkle with parmesan and eat with crusty bread.

Slow-cooker minestrone soup with beef and bacon
Follow recipe above, replacing vegetable stock with beef stock. Add 200g diced stewing beef and 1 rasher diced bacon to ingredients. Place all ingredients, except pasta and kidney beans, in slow cooker and cook on high for 5—6 hours (or on low for 10—11 hours). Add pasta and beans in final 20—30 minutes of cooking.

*To make your own stock, you can use the recipe from pg. 186 of The Food Book.

The Food BookThis recipe is taken from Oxford’s The Food Book.
9780195570403
AU$51.95

Oxford Word of the Month – May: Spill

Parliament House Canberraspillnoun: the deliberate creation of vacant positions in a cabinet, political party, or organisation.

In recent months in 2015, we have seen an attempt by Federal backbencher MPs of the Liberal Party to put forward a spill motion. Had this motion been successful, it would have led to a spill, where (in this case) the position of party leader became vacant, and candidates could stand for election to the position. The word spill in this sense is an Australian English term, and has a long history, being first recorded in 1945:

Should Mr Makin be selected his place in Cabinet will not be filled because it will become unnecessary and this will thwart some of the more ambitious younger members of the party who attempted at a recent Caucus meeting in Canberra to secure a ‘spill’ of Ministerial positions in the hope that the new ballot would throw them into the Cabinet. (Canberra Times, 20 August)

Spill is most often used in political contexts, and often in relation to the question of the leadership of a political party. In 1971, for example, Prime Minister John Gorton was challenged by William McMahon; when the call for a leadership spill was successful and the party room vote was tied, Gorton cast his deciding vote against himself, thus losing the leadership. Paul Keating challenged Bob Hawke twice for leadership of the Labor Party, succeeding the second time, and taking the Prime Ministership.

While federal party examples are more famous, spills can also happen at the state level, as in this example from Victorian politics:

Mr Hunt said last night he would not be a challenger for the party leadership and he holds no brief for any particular contender. But he said his decision to move for a spill of party positions, one of the most difficult of his 25 years as an MP, had been made because Mr Kennett had destabilised the party with his remarks last Thursday that the Liberals may force an early election. (Sydney Morning Herald, 18 October 1986)

Spills can happen in other contexts: for example, in some organisations (often public ones), positions can be declared vacant, especially at senior levels. The following comment by ICAC Commissioner Barry O’Keefe in 1996 refers to his argument that senior positions in the New South Wales Police Force should be declared vacant so as to rid the Force of ineffective senior executives:

Consideration ought to be given to whether the new accountability requirements require a spill of positions and a new selection process for all senior executive service positions. Such a process has commonly been used throughout the public service, when a major restructure or change in responsibilities has occurred. (Daily Telegraph, 15 August)

Spill is in our Australian Oxford dictionaries, and will be included in the second edition of the Australian National Dictionary.