Connecting with Law Short Film Competition 2016 Winners

he_connecting_with_law_2016_web_featureboxThe Connecting with Law Short Film Competition is an annual event run by Oxford University Press Australia & New Zealand. It is open to all students enrolled in an Australian law degree and has proven itself to be unique way of encouraging Australian law students to connect with their field of study and contribute to legal education in Australia.

This year, the ninth consecutive year of the competition, students were invited to make a two- to five-minute film exploring the 2016 theme, ‘Why study law?’ The winning entry was judged to be the most creative, instructive and original, with the team demonstrating an ability to reflect critically and creatively on the theme.

1st prize winner: Day One
Kit Mun Lee, Liam Hartley, Edward Wong, Quang Ngyuen
(University of Melbourne)

This film humorously attempts to capture the reality of those first few classes in law school where students answer ‘that’ question – why study law? Such a question produces an array of responses, ranging from passion for reading and writing to self-empowerment to the chance to do something interesting.

Though valid reasons, often times these incentives are fallible and even steeped in fantasy – such self-driven motivations for studying law can be unrealistic. Therefore, this film satirises these fantasies and contrasts them to the more meaningful motivation for studying law – helping people and effecting positive change in others.

Please note that we have decided to only award first place this year, as we feel the other entries did not meet the criteria of the submission guidelines and were thus ineligible to place.

It is our hope that the 10th Anniversary of the Short Film Competition will see participants embracing the competition with a renewed sense of enthusiasm.

Thank you for supporting the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition. Please stay tuned to our website for details about next year’s competition in early 2017.

Top tips for entering the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition

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Have you been thinking about entering the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition this year?
Are you having trouble getting started with your film?
Do you need help getting your creative juices flowing?

We recently spoke to some of our previous film competition winners about their filmmaking experiences and asked if they had any advice for law students thinking of submitting an entry in 2016. Here are their top tips:

Molly Clarke, University of Notre Dame Sydney
Connecting with Law Short Film Competition Winner 2015

Choose an area of law or case that you are passionate about. If you are passionate about it, it’ll make you want to work so much harder.

  • Utilize any technology that is available to you. We shot some of the film on an iPhone 6! Some things you already have, like your phone or your computer, will be nearly as good as professional equipment.
  • Take this opportunity to collaborate with students that study law with you. We had such a great time working on the film together and we are excited to get the group together to make another one again this year!

Watch Molly’s team entry, Chester v Waverly Council (1939) 62 CLR 1

Katy Milne, Monash University
Connecting with Law Short Film Competition Winner 2014

  • Choose an aspect of the topic that you are personally drawn to and explore this fully rather than trying to cover the whole field. I read a whole lot of different cases about lawyers doing naughty things (the topic was legal ethics) before I decided how to proceed. This was very entertaining in itself.
  • Be quite brutal with yourself. I wrote out a narrative before I started and then listened to how it sounded. Some bits just didn’t work so I removed or reworked them. There were parts of the story that I really quite liked but cut because I couldn’t get the story to flow well with them present.
  • Leave a good amount of time for the technical stuff. I used an iPhone and tripod to make my film however, the sound from the iPhone was not of sufficient quality. As a consequence, I recorded the voiced narration directly on to my computer. As someone with no film making experience, it took a fair bit of experimentation and time to work out the best combination of equipment to make the film.

Watch Katy’s entry, Ethics in Social Media: Advice for the legal hound-dog

Jason Allen, Deakin University
Connecting with Law Short Film Competition Joint winner 2013

  • Focus on sound.  Given the choice between working on your picture or your sound it seems most people focus on the video.  Think of your experiences with YouTube – most people will put up with less than cinema quality video, far fewer people stick through a video with annoying, poor quality sound.  If you have limited resources you’ll get more “bang for your buck” in terms of the quality of your overall end product by focusing more on your audio than you otherwise might.

    As a side note every camera going around works off of light.  Almost invariably adding more light will get you a better quality picture – grab some cheap Bunnings floodlights and use them to look a TON better.

  • Aim for humour. All things being equal funny but wrong probably wins over a boring yet scholarly lecture (think of your Uni lectures).  It doesn’t need to be a ROFL comedy but try and make your work at least funny enough so as not to be dry.  Not much worse than a boring educational video…
  • Take the road less travelled.  There’s probably going to be one or two fairly obvious angles you could take on whatever the topic is.  Spend the time to try and come up with something unique, a bit more creative – an idea that you don’t think anyone else will go with.  It’s far easier to stand out in a crowd of one than a crowd of dozens.

Watch Jason’s entry, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Law

Learn more about the competition, read our submission guidelines and download an entry form from the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition homepage.

Written by Stephanie Swain, Higher Education – Marketing and Product Specialist

Connecting with Law Short Film Competition launches for 2016

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The Connecting with Law Short Film Competition is an annual event run by Oxford University Press Australia & New Zealand. Now in its ninth year, the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition is open to all tertiary students currently enrolled in a law unit at an Australian university.

This year, we are asking students ‘why study law?’ To enter, students need to create a 2 – 5 minute film about what inspires them to study law that will educate, entertain and engage other law students and help them connect with law. Films could explore this theme from a number of angles, including the law school experience, how studying law can positively affect your life and understanding of the world, or why future students should start law school.

Not only are there great cash prizes to be won, but here are three reasons why you consider entering the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition this year:

  • Showcase your creativity: the competition allows you to apply your legal skills and knowledge in a creative setting and think outside of the lecture theatre. We understand that studying law can be a sizeable academic commitment – so why not take a brain break between readings and start filming?
  • Bond with other law students: this is a great opportunity to pair up with a classmate to work on an entry. Struggling to find a collaborator? Why not place a call-out through your campus law society and build your dream team.
  • Get your name known in law: The winning entries are shared with law schools across Australia, so you can get your name known in law before you start your legal career (and add breadth to your LinkedIn profile!)

Want to learn more? Visit the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition homepage to read our submission guidelines, download an entry form or watch the 2015 winners.

All of the winning and commended entries from previous years can be viewed online at the Connecting with Law Film Library.

Written by Stephanie Swain, Higher Education – Marketing and Product Specialist

Connecting with Law Short Film Competition 2015 Winners

HE_CWL_2015_WEB_FB_FAThe ‘Connecting with Law Short Film Competition’ is an annual event run by Oxford University Press Australia & New Zealand. Now in its seventh year, the ‘Connecting with Law Short Film Competition’ runs from March to July and is open to all students currently enrolled in an Australian law school. Over the years, the competition has proven to be a unique way to encourage students to connect with the law and make a contribution to legal education in Australia.

This year, students were invited to make a two- to five-minute film exploring the 2015 theme, ‘bring your favourite case to life’. The standard of entries submitted was very impressive and the winners were those judged to be the most creative, instructive and original. They demonstrated an ability to understand and analyse case law, and will help to educate and entertain Australian law students. We are pleased to share the winning entries:

1st prize winner: Chester v Waverly Council (1939) 62 CLR 1
Ray Waterhouse, Nikita Vidyaev, Bella Noon, Ben O’Sullivan & Molly-Anne Clark (University of Notre Dame, Sydney)

Donoghue v Stevenson is the dawn of the modern law of negligence. Just seven years later, the High Court considered a negligence claim made by Mrs Chester. Her young boy, Maxie, drowned in a flooded council trench. She witnessed his body being lifted from the trench and suffered nervous shock as a result. Her claim failed in the High Court because the majority said that it was not foreseeable that a mother would suffer nervous shock in those circumstances.

Justice Evatt dissented. He found her reaction entirely foreseeable. He was the only judge to identify Maxie by name. He humanised Mrs Chester and her loss. The power of his dissent has resonated down the years. His reasoning was vindicated by Justice Deane in Jaensch v Coffey in 1984 and by Justice Gaudron in Annetts v Australian Stations Pty Limited in 2002. Evatt J’s judgment illustrates the importance of dissenting judgements – sometimes their reasoning is picked up by later judgements and becomes the law. His judgement was more forward looking than the blinkered legalisms of the majority. In the words of Deane J, Evatt’s judgement was plainly to be preferred to that of the majority.

2nd prize winner: An Expert’s Opinion on his Ordinary Observation: The Case of Honeysett
Jonathan Mo (University of New South Wales)

3rd prize winner: Precisely Nothing: Fagan v Metropolitan Police Commissioner
Lauren Stefanou & Rebecca Ward (University of New South Wales)

Interested in participating next year? Stay tuned to our website for more details about the 9th ‘Connecting with Law Short Film Competition’ in 2016.

Stephanie Swain
Higher Education – Product and Marketing Specialist, OUP ANZ

Connecting with Law Short Film Competition launches for 2015

Connecting with LawThe Connecting with Law Short Film Competition is an annual event run by Oxford University Press Australia & New Zealand. Now in its eighth year, the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition is open to all tertiary students currently enrolled in an Australian law school.

The Connecting with Law Short Film Competition is an annual event run by Oxford University Press Australia & New Zealand. Now in its eighth year, the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition is open to all tertiary students currently enrolled in an Australian law school.

This year, we are asking participants to ‘bring your favourite case to life’ in the form of a video case note. To enter, students need to create a 2 – 5 minute film that provides a summary of their chosen case that will educate, entertain and engage students and help them connect with law.

We are looking for original and creative entries that highlight cases of interest to Australian law students (this means thinking beyond Donoghue v Stevenson’s snail in the bottle!) and show an ability to successfully prepare a case note and analyse case law. Not only are there great cash prizes to be won, but this is also a unique opportunity for students to get their names known in law.

Want to learn more? Visit the Connecting with Law Short Film Competition homepage  to read our submission guidelines, get tips on preparing a case note, download an entry form or watch the 2014 winners.

All of the winning and commended entries from previous years can be viewed online on the Connecting with Law Film Library.
Written by Stephanie Swain, Higher Education – Product and Marketing Specialist

Connecting with Law Short Film Competition 2014 Winners

Oxford, OUPANZ, Connecting with Law Short Film CompetitionThe ‘Connecting with Law Short Film Competition’ is an annual event run by Oxford University Press Australia & New Zealand. Now in its seventh year, the ‘Connecting with Law Short Film Competition’ runs from March to July and is open to all students currently enrolled in an Australian law school. Over the years, the competition has proven to be a unique way to encourage students to connect with the law and make a contribution to legal education in Australia.

This year, students were invited to make a two- to five-minute film exploring the 2014 theme, ‘Legal ethics: thinking, acting, being’. The standard of entries submitted was very impressive and the winners were those judged to be the most creative, instructive and original in helping to educate and entertain Australian law students. We are pleased to share the winning entries:

1st prize winner: Ethics in social media: Advice for the legal hound-dog
Katy Milne (Monash University)

This is a film about George, the legal hound-dog, who lazed his way through the online world blissfully unaware of the ethical dilemmas he was creating for himself as a lawyer.

We thought Ethics in social media was a very creative, entertaining and informative approach to the 2014 competition theme. It explores a topical aspect of legal ethics that is especially pertinent to law students, in their studies and beyond to their future careers.

2nd prize winner: Lie: A guide to legal ethics
Harrison Jones (Bond University)

3rd prize winner: The Questionable Ethics of Malcolm Practice
Madeleine Brown (University of Technology, Sydney)

The judges also selected a highly commended entry:

Do’s and Don’ts – Shyla Sivanas and Raad Haque (Monash University)

All of the past winning and commended entries can be viewed online at the Connecting with Law Film Library.

Interested in participating next year? Stay tuned to our website for more details about the 8th ‘Connecting with Law Short Film Competition’ in March 2015.

Stephanie Swain
Higher Education – Product and Marketing Specialist, OUP ANZ